Instructional Strategies

Objective:
An instructional or learning strategy is a teaching method that the Instructor uses to create an interactive learning environment that engages the learners in thinking critically,increasingmotivation, and enhancing the learning process towards achieving their academic goals.

Instructional strategies “can be classed as direct, indirect, interactive, experiential, or independent” (Instructional Approaches). There is not one best instructional strategy, “the key is to use the right strategy at the right time” (Instructional Strategies for Student Success).

“Effective teaching is not a set of generic practices, but instead is a set of context-driven decisions about teaching. Effective teachers do not use the same set of practices for every lesson” (Instructional Approaches). It is vital that the instructor utilizes a assortment of instructional strategies in the learning environment to accommodate alllearning styles while challenging the learner in achieving the learning objectives of the session.

“Successful teaching is measured by learning gains. A lesson is only as effective as it’s reflection in student achievement” (Instructional Strategies How to Teach for Rigor).

Reflective:
The instructional strategies that you chose as an Instructor to implement in your learning environment must “be congruent with the learning outcome first and foremost” (Teaching and Learning Centre). When selecting strategies to use you must consider the program goals, characteristics of adult learners, prior experience of learners, and the variety of learning styles of the learners. By using a variety of instructional strategies will improve your effectiveness in the classroom setting.

Upon researching and reflecting for this journal article I realized that I do a lot of instructional activities in my sessions. I refer to them as break out group activities or activities, but in fact they are instructional strategies to motivate and engage the learner to a higher level of thinking. The response from the learners is positive especially if it involves a case scenario strategy.

The instructor’s role in using an instructional strategy in the classroom is to choose the right strategy at the right time, provide a positive learning climate, and provide clear directions for using the strategy, and being prepared to use the strategy. And engaging in critical self-reflection and evaluation after each session to determine the effetiveness of the strategies used.

Interpretive:
As an adult educator I must utilize a variety of instructional strategies in the classroom setting to enhance the learner’s learning. By utilizing a variety of strategies will ensure that all learning styles have an opportunity to learn. These activities must be aligned to meet the course objectives while engaging and motivating the learner. Prior to implementing an instructional strategy the instructor has a responsibility to inform the learners of the objective of the strategy, guidelines for using the strategy, and how they will work through the strategy. By utilizing a variety of instructional strategies will move the learner towards independence and self-directed learning.

Decisional:
In November I will be instructing a semester one and four professional practice module in the Practical Nursing Program and am excited about increasing the amount of instructional strategies that I use in the classroom.

While researching I found that the following instructional strategies are effective in health care education; cooperative learning, group discussions, independent study, portfolio development, journals and learning logs, simulations and role-playing.I currently use cooperative learning, group discussions, portfolio development, and learning plans in all my classes.

I am going to engage in informal learning to identify what are the best instructional strategies to use in professional practice courses for nurses.

“As educators, we should strive to design and develop instruction that is effective, consistent, and meaningful”(Principles of Effective Instruction).

References:
Barkley, Elizabeth F., (2010) Student Engagement Techniques A Handbook for College
Faculty

Brunette, Jane, Instructional Strategies, Retrieved from the World Wide Web on October
9, 2013, http://www.gwu.edu/~cooptchr/Instruction/instructionalstrats.htm

Gale Encyclopedia of Education, Re Retrieved from the World Wide Web on
October 8, 2013, http://www.answers.com/topic/instructional-strategies

Instructional Strategies for Student Success, Retrieved from the World Wide Web on
October 8, 2013, http://www.sagepub.com/upm-data/53691_Gregory_Ch_6.pdf

Instructional Strategies How to Teach for Rigor, Retrieved from the World Wide Web on October 8, 2013,
http://www.docjax.com/document/view.shtml?id=1443562&title=Instructional%20Strategies%20-%20International%20Center%20for%20Leadership%20in%20

McTighe, Jay, Wiggins, Grant, (2013) Essential Question Opening Doors to Student
Understanding

Northern Illinois Univeristy, Retreived from the World Wide Web on October 10, 2013, http://www.niu.edu/facdev/resources/guide/principles/principles_of_effective_instruction.pdf

Teaching Resources for Florida ESE, Retrieved from the World Wide Web on October 9,
2013, http://www.cpt.fsu.edu/eseold/in/strmain.html

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